Sand Sculptures In Revere

I finally made it to the International Sand Sculpting Festival in Revere a couple weeks ago. Just six miles north of Boston, the event started in 2004 and nearly every year it was noted on my calendar as a must do photo project. I went several days after the primary weekend of the event and we had some rain showers the two days prior to my getting there. As you’ll see, however, most of the works help up beautifully!

 

Enjoying Its Time Of Glory

After finishing an engagement shoot in the Public Garden, I enjoyed a couple more of those ‘great to be in the city’ moments. Here’s part one. (Part two is below.)

I had taken a few images with my clients in the park at a small maple tree with autumn leaves as red as you’ll ever find.  After the shoot, I returned to the tree …enjoying the appreciation people had of its beauty.  Everyone had a different means of expression and that’s what I wanted to capture. I chatted with many after taking a few shots of them….giving some my card and offering to send them pictures. They were from all over the world….China, India, England, Canada, Mexico and Colombia.

Most of the year, this maple tree is dwarfed by its neighbors in the park. Most are much taller or more exotic. Some were brought in from other parts of the world. But, for about two weeks in October, this little tree is the gem of the park and in all its glory.

 

Right Place, Right Time

This story is part two of my adventures on Saturday after finishing an engagement shoot in Boston’s Public Garden. I was on the Public Garden bridge walking back to my car. As is typical for a beautiful weekend afternoon, the bridge was inundated with people. Somehow, amidst the crowd, I spotted a guy showing a woman a small box which held a ring. I stopped in my tracks and took a second to try to determine exactly what was happening. Was this part of another engagement shoot? I quickly glanced over each shoulder and, seeing no photographer nearby, I grabbed my camera from around my neck and, without saying a word, I just started shooting. I was about five feet away. After about 30 seconds, a few other people joined them. It turned out it was a real proposal and,  unbeknownst to the new bride-to-be, their parents were observing from a short distance away.  I was happy to be able to provide them with pictures a couple days later. Congratulations Rachel and Travis!

 

The Imbuement Of Shells Ceremony

After Coco and John’s wedding ceremony, they and their guests took part in an interesting and unique event that, I assumed, was part of Coco’s Philippine culture.  She had collected a variety of seashells and each guest took one, placed it against his/her heart and  took a private moment. They then threw the shell out over the cliff, upon which the Hammond Castle is built, to the ocean below. Here are Coco’s words about the ceremony.  “I thought long and hard about doing something that paid tribute to the beauty of the North Shore and, at the same time, honoring our dearly departed as we begin our new lives as family. It was also an opportunity for our family and friends to give us their blessings…. like an affirmative prayer. The act of casting them into the ocean sends those loving thoughts and energy out into the universe as a signal that will attract unto us those same loving positive energies. I called it The Imbuement Of Shells Ceremony.”

 

A Nod To da Vinci

At Coco and John’s wedding (see the related post below), I had five minutes to shoot the Hammond Castle’s reception room before the guests were allowed to enter. When I saw the setting around one of the tables, an idea came to mind. Many thanks to my ‘apostles’ for their cooperation.  Here’s to you, Leonardo!